Different Types of Kitchen Chimney Filters

No one likes food that is too oily or greasy, and more importantly, no-cook wants their kitchen and home to be filled with harmful particles floating around in the air.

Cooking, believe it or not, releases harmful particles, which tend to be 1-10 micro diameters and can cause severe respiratory disorders, among other problems.

A kitchen chimney is an electronic device that helps you get rid of fumes and toxic particles formed when cooking. It also traps oil droplets emitted into the air when preparing your food, ensuring that your home is properly maintained.

There is a filter in every chimney that traps the grease and allows the heat and smoke to pass through to the duct and out of the kitchen in a very smooth and efficient manner. But there is more than one type of filter present in today’s chimney models.

Suppose you are wondering which chimney filter is perfect for your kitchen and cooking style. In that case, it is vital that we first understand what kind of chimney filters exist today and their unique technology and uses.

This article will tell you about the different chimney filters available in the market, their mechanism, their advantages & disadvantages, side-by-side comparisons, and of course, public reviews of chimneys containing such filters to provide you with an extensive and informative write-up on the different kitchen chimney filters.

 

Types of filters:

Although new technology might introduce us to newer filter models as time passes, currently, there are 3 types of chimney filters available:

Mesh/Cassette Filter

Cassette Filter

Structure:

These filters usually have multiple layers of aluminum or stainless steel in them (stainless steel ones costing more) to trap various particles in the form of smoke, grease, oil droplets, etc.

Although the stainless-steel cassette filters are the preferred option in most cases for the higher quality in the material and the fact that it is easier to clean, the aluminum ones tend to be lighter and easier to handle but harder to wash & clean.

 

Maintenance:

Dish wash liquids and baking soda can be used to maintain the cleanliness of the filter. These filters tend to be pretty high maintenance and require a thorough cleaning at least once a week.

 

Functioning:

Mesh filters are permeable – have small pore-like openings, allowing air to pass through. Any object that is larger than the mesh gets caught in it. As a result, mesh filters must be cleaned regularly to function properly.

Pros: These are the Pros of the Cassette filter –

  • It is quite cheap
  • It is a really light filter, so anyone can easily detach it from the chimney for cleaning purposes, etc.
  • It is small and easy to handle.
  • This type of filter can even be put into a dishwasher to be washed.

Cons: These are the Cons of the Cassette filter –

  • It requires high maintenance – regular cleaning every week is needed for smooth functioning.
  • These filters are not suitable for Indian culinary since they are not built to handle large oil-infused aerosols that are formed in the air of Indian kitchens.
  • They tend to impose recurring repair costs, etc.
  • The frequent blockages can reduce the suction capacity of the chimney itself.
  • They tend to make more noise than other filters like the baffle filter.
  • High temperatures may cause the filter to stop functioning totally.

 

Baffle Filter

Baffle Filter

Structure:

A baffle filter is made up of many curved stainless-steel panels. The surface is then built up with a particular curvature at numerous places to allow air to flow through it while retaining oil and grease contaminants.

Aluminum baffle filters are also a possibility, but they are relatively uncommon. Grease and oil particles are no longer regarded as impediments for baffle filters because of how they work. This keeps the air suction power of the chimney unaffected and increases overall efficiency.

 

Maintenance:

Maintenance is much lower in this filter when compared to a Cassette filter. It only requires a thorough cleaning with dishwashing liquids once in three or four months. Even a dishwasher machine would suffice.

 

Functioning:

The circulation of air pulled up by a baffle filter is controlled. It uses a unique ‘ cut and chop’ approach to remove the oil and food fragments from the fumes.

It’s equipped with various curved surfaces that trap oil and grease while allowing filthy air to escape through PVC vents. The filter’s oil absorption has little effect on air suction.

 

Pros: These are the Pros of the Baffle filter –

  • They are low-maintenance filters. Dishwashers and other valuable liquids are adequate to clean the filter well once in 3-4 months.
  • It is a much more durable model in comparison to a Mesh filter.
  • It has a better airflow mechanism (due to the suction power motor present in such filters) and, therefore, greater efficiency in many ways.
  • It is apt for Indian households as it is built to handle spicy & oily cooking.

Cons: These are the Cons of the Baffle filter –

  • They cost more than other filters due to the advantages mentioned above.
  • They can be pretty heavy for a chimney filter, making it harder to handle and detach from the chimney.

 

Charcoal Filter

Charcoal Filter

Structure:

Carbon filters are used in conjunction with mesh/baffle filters as secondary filtration. It captures the unwanted odor from cooking while also assisting the primary filter in absorbing oil particulates, grease, and smoke.

The name “charcoal filter” comes from the fact that they are composed mainly of Charcoal. The width and thickness of the charcoal granules determine the filter’s absorbance capability.

 

Maintenance:

This secondary filter is not washable as it is primarily made of Charcoal. Therefore, regular renewal of Charcoal filters must be made for the proper functioning of the chimney.

 

Functioning:

Charcoal filters effectively eliminate smells released from cooking by utilizing their intentionally enlarged surface features, which are employed to instantly trap unpleasant compounds.

Adsorption is the method by which contaminants adhere to the surface of carbon molecules. They are removed from the air movement and hence are unable to circulate in the air.

 

Pros: These are the Pros of the Charcoal filter –

  • Their impressive technology helps improve hygiene significantly in the kitchen.
  • It serves well as a secondary filter and traps any contaminants which might have slipped through the primary filter.

Cons: These are the Cons of the Charcoal filter –

  • They do require a considerable amount of maintenance since they are not washable.
  • Buying new charcoal filters regularly results in an additional cost for the chimney as a whole.

 

Comparison of Filters:

 Mesh &Baffle filters

Mesh filter Baffle filter
Usually made with Aluminum material Usually made with stainless-steel
Uses the tiny pores to trap and settle unwanted particles. Adopts a “cut and chop” approach.
Inexpensive Expensive
Lighter &more manageable to handle Heavier & harder to handle
Requires high-maintenance Requires lower maintenance
Not suitable for Indian Kitchens Apt for Indian Kitchens

 

Mesh & Charcoal filters

Mesh filter Charcoal filter
Usually made with Aluminum material Always made up of Charcoal, as the name suggests.
Uses tiny pores to trap and settle unwanted particles. The Charcoal granules trap the contaminants.
Utilized as the primary filter in all cases. Considered to be the secondary filter in the chimney.
Requires higher maintenance. Requires lower maintenance, but still higher than Baffle filters.
Inexpensive The expense cannot be compared per se since this has a different role altogether. Both components are required in the chimney for greater efficiency.
Easier to wash and clean (dishwasher can be used) Not washable. The entire filter must be changed once the saturation limit has been reached.

 

Baffle& Charcoal filters

Baffle filter Charcoal filter
Usually made with stainless-steel Always made up of Charcoal, as the name suggests.
Uses a “cut and chop” technique The Charcoal granules trap the contaminants.
Utilized as the primary filter in all cases. Considered to be the secondary filter in the chimney.
Requires low maintenance. Requires higher maintenance but lower than Cassette filters.
Inexpensive The expense cannot be compared per se since this has a different role altogether. Both components are required in the chimney for greater efficiency.
Easier to wash and clean (dishwasher can be used) Not washable. The entire filter must be changed once the saturation limit has been reached.

 

Conclusion:

In conclusion, if you are looking for the best quality chimney for your kitchen in India, it would be advisable to select a chimney from a reliable company (‘Kaff’ chimneys are pretty famous), something with Baffle filters and secondary Charcoal filters as well. This will provide you with a sequence of advantages and reasonable shortcomings while also being time-efficient and durable. But suppose you are low on budget or willing to sacrifice quality for cost. In that case, a chimney with Cassette filters should be sufficient to do the job. Making a well-informed decision by reading the above article will help keep your kitchen smelling good and, more importantly, free of harmful substances in the air that raise health concerns.

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